Janis: Little Girl Blue film review
Janis Joplin

Janis: Little Girl Blue film review

Janis: Little Girl Blue  ***out of 4 stars

directed by: Amy Berg

Another great female-musician doc that can almost stand with this year’s AMY, Janis: Little Girl Blue damn near-puts you in the face of one of the best and most influential singer’s ever. Following Janis Joplin’s start from a her humble origins in the Texas town of Port Arthur, to her death by heroin overdose in Hollywood in October 1970, Janis is shown as a fragile artist who wanted nothing but to love and be loved by others. So what drove her to her demise? The film, given a bluesy- psychedelic- jam by director Amy Berg(West of Memphis), interviews bandmates from Big Brother and the Holding Company, ex-lovers, and others that were close enough to her to shine light on those answers.  Not having the most self esteem based on her un-feminine features, Janis took in everything around her, feeding off the love and energy others had for her. But if she wasn’t getting good vibes from others, such as her fans, it literally tore her to shreds, leading her to the abuse of alcohol and drugs. But there was never any doubt of her talent, which would leave audiences at her shows floored. When her band mates played rock, she sang the blues. Cat Powers narrates wonderfully on Janis’s journal entries that help guide the film. But at times, Amy Berg back tracks, showing answers we have already been given. But if you really want to know what was going on in the beautiful mind of Janis Joplin, just watch the stunning footage of her performing and on the road. That tells you everything. Even though she died at the young age of  twenty-seven, this little girl blue lived one hell of a exciting life.

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